Now Playing Tracks

Diversity Is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing by Daniel Jose Older

These two essays perfectly frame the emotional and social debacle of publishing and diversity today. They begin with this stat: “Of 3,200 children’s books published in 2013, just 93 were about black people,” according to a study by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center at the University of Wisconsin. The wide world of literature in general, and by no coincidence, the publishing industry itself, suffer from similarly disastrous numbers.

When Christopher Myers asked his uncomfortable questions about the apartheid in children’s lit, the industry hid behind The Market. The publishing industry, people often say as if it’s a gigantic revelation, needs to make money and as such, it responds to The Market, and people don’t buy books about characters of color. This is updated marketing code for “you people don’t read,” and it’s used to justify any number of inexcusable problems in literature. “The Market is so comfortably intangible,” Myers writes, “that no one is worried I will go knocking down any doors. The Market, I am told, just doesn’t demand this kind of book… because white kids won’t buy a book with a black kid on the cover—or so The Market says, despite millions of music albums that are sold in just that way.”

(Source: talesofthestarshipregeneration)

trendgraphy:

The Art of Whimsical Lettering.

A “font” of information on lettering styles!

The Art of Whimsical Lettering is an artful instruction book on creating stylized fonts and expressive artwork with personal handwriting skills. Author Joanne Sharpe shows you how to create exuberant and personalized writing styles for your artwork–whether it be a journal, canvas art, or other projects that use text.

After an overview of Joanne’s favorite tools and surfaces, take a peek into Joanne’s personal lettering journal to discover how you too can collect inspiration, hone your lettering skills, and tap into your natural creativity. Joanne then demonstrates twenty art techniques for creating a variety of lettering styles using many different tools. She provides you with fifteen basic alphabets, ranging from simple pen-and-ink renditions to increasingly elaborated texts that reference calligraphy, vintage fonts, and doodle art, among other styles. Joanne also teaches you how to turn prosaic lettering into page art itself, merging text into illustration, or ornamenting words with decorative drawings.

See more detials here:http://amzn.to/1mvgpcG

futurerevolutions asked:

What exactly are the approximate races of Alana and Marko? Like it's a fantasy/sci-fi deal so I know they're aliens but, let's be real, I seriously doubt the team would stray from this kind of question since they write a comic like this and the artist is an ~awake~ WoC?????

fionastaples:

benrankel:

sagacomic:

“This is an original fantasy book with no superheroes, two non-white leads and an opening chapter featuring graphic robot sex. I thought we might be cancelled by our third issue.”

- Brian K. Vaughan (x)

Both Brian and Fiona have repeatedly said that their heroes are PoC. And of course it’s clear from Fiona’s illustrations that neither Alana nor Marko are white, but that Alana has darker skin than Marko.

The only featured/recurring character in the Saga universe who actually seems to have white skin is The Stalk.

However, I still come across white-washed Saga fan art and fancasting posts, which never cease to amaze and infuriate me. No matter how pretty the art, I will never repost that shit.

If people genuinely see these characters as white, they need to check their eyesight or their racism. And I doubt the optometrist will find any deficiencies.

Thanks for the ask. I haven’t had a good rant on this subject in a while!

Personal pet peeve is folks who think Marko is white. He ain’t.

Marko is meant to be Asian- more specifically, I combined features from a handful of Japanese models and actors when I was designing him. I can see why people sometimes mistake him for white, because I avoided using exaggerated racial markers (slanted eyes, rounded nose, etc). With simple cartoon drawings like these, a lot is left to the reader’s imagination. So I accept there will be some misidentification because I didn’t draw Marko’s family like Mulan characters, haha.

I see Alana as having mixed heritage. When I drew her father I was envisioning an Indian man. Her mother remains a mystery!

image

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union